GRENED

The Grenada Education & Development Programme

The Grenada Education & Development Programme

All posts by Dilma Wickham

Panel Discussion on the Reparations

 

GRENED staff with panelists of the Reparations event

GRENED’s Executive Director Dessima Williams and Administrative Officer Dilma Wickham hosted members of a panel on emancipation, reparations and the SDGs. Panelists were Ambassadors Arley Gill and Kennedy Roberts and reparations advocate Laura Trevelyan. The session was held in Grenville at the Deluxe cinema for secondary school children on Wednesday September 6th and moderated by retired educator Maria Viechweg. We had in attendance students from the Grenville Secondary School (GSS), the St.Andrew Anglican Secondary School (SAASS), St.Joseph Convent Grenville (SJC), teachers, and members of the public. The first speaker Ambassador Arley Gill, chairman on the National Reparations Commission spoke on the history of Grenada and why it is important for the Europeans to pay reparations and apologize for their ancestors role in slavery. Our second panelist Laura Trevelyan, a reparations advocate whose ancestors owned numerous slaves and plantation in Grenada, apologizes for their role in slavery and paid reparations in which allocations were made for education in Grenada. The final speaker Ambassador Kennedy Roberts presented to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), what they are, and how we can work together to achieve these goals. After each panelist contributed to the topic of reparations, the event concluded with questions that were asked by the audience which included the students, teachers and members of the general public. 

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Panel Discussion on the Reparations

 

GRENED staff with panelists of the Reparations event

GRENED’s Executive Director Dessima Williams and Administrative Officer Dilma Wickham hosted members of a panel on emancipation, reparations and the SDGs. Panelists were Ambassadors Arley Gill and Kennedy Roberts and reparations advocate Laura Trevelyan. The session was held in Grenville at the Deluxe cinema for secondary school children on Wednesday September 6th and moderated by retired educator Maria Viechweg. We had in attendance students from the Grenville Secondary School (GSS), the St.Andrew Anglican Secondary School (SAASS), St.Joseph Convent Grenville (SJC), teachers, and members of the public. The first speaker Ambassador Arley Gill, chairman on the National Reparations Commission spoke on the history of Grenada and why it is important for the Europeans to pay reparations and apologize for their ancestors role in slavery. Our second panelist Laura Trevelyan, a reparations advocate whose ancestors owned numerous slaves and plantation in Grenada, apologizes for their role in slavery and paid reparations in which allocations were made for education in Grenada. The final speaker Ambassador Kennedy Roberts presented to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), what they are, and how we can work together to achieve these goals. After each panelist contributed to the topic of reparations, the event concluded with questions that were asked by the audience which included the students, teachers and members of the general public. 

Interview

Interview between Dr.Williams and Jeanne

Synopsis: Jeanne donated a scholarship in memory of her grandfather for a GRENED student to continue their education

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Interview

Interview between Dr.Williams and Jeanne

Synopsis: Jeanne donated a scholarship in memory of her grandfather for a GRENED student to continue their education

New Land: Kalinago Dream
GRENED students at the Kalinago Dream event

On Friday March 17th, some of our students attended the New Life: Kalinago Dream event at the Deluxe Cinema in Grenville. This Event was based on a Grenadian film of the indigenous people of Dominica, who are fighting to preserve their history and culture among the rapid modernization and invasive cultures that threaten their survival. 
The film is a joint effort between Grenadian film maker and Creative Director of Grenada film company, Teddy Dwight Frederick and German Production company, Time of Motion. Film maker Frederick stressed on the importance of keeping the Kalinago conversation alive.
According to dominicanewsonline film maker Frederick said “Grenada also has a lot of beautiful stories, and we also have Kalinago ancestry and history, and it will be nice to tell our side of the story.”  The film was released in Germany on 14 November 2022, in the Czech Republic on 7 February 2023, and in Grenada on 9 March 2023.
This event was a great opportunity for our students to understand the history and culture of a vulnerable group of people (The Kalinagos) who are being threatened by the modernization of the world.

 

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New Land: Kalinago Dream
GRENED students at the Kalinago Dream event

On Friday March 17th, some of our students attended the New Life: Kalinago Dream event at the Deluxe Cinema in Grenville. This Event was based on a Grenadian film of the indigenous people of Dominica, who are fighting to preserve their history and culture among the rapid modernization and invasive cultures that threaten their survival. 
The film is a joint effort between Grenadian film maker and Creative Director of Grenada film company, Teddy Dwight Frederick and German Production company, Time of Motion. Film maker Frederick stressed on the importance of keeping the Kalinago conversation alive.
According to dominicanewsonline film maker Frederick said “Grenada also has a lot of beautiful stories, and we also have Kalinago ancestry and history, and it will be nice to tell our side of the story.”  The film was released in Germany on 14 November 2022, in the Czech Republic on 7 February 2023, and in Grenada on 9 March 2023.
This event was a great opportunity for our students to understand the history and culture of a vulnerable group of people (The Kalinagos) who are being threatened by the modernization of the world.

 

Project: CSOs for Disaster Resilience (IAF)

 

CSOs for Disaster Resilience

Empowering civil society organisation and local communities to build resilience to hurricanes and climate extremes in the Eastern Caribbean

 

The projects seeks to build resilience in local communities against hurricanes and climate extremes in the Eastern Caribbean by incorporating the use of community & ecosystem- based disaster risk reduction (CBDRR/Eco-DRR). The selected community will undergo a Vulnerability Capacity Assessment ( VCA), which involves speaking with residents to identify vulnerable/ at risk areas that are prone to the effects of hurricanes and other climate extremes. 

This project is funded by the Inter-American foundation (IAF), presented by the Caribbean Natural Resource Institute (CANARI) and implemented by Grenada Education and Development Programme  (GRENED). 

A total to 2 communities, Balthazar & Telescope were selected for this project to address the environmental issues faced for years based on the vulnerability capacity assessment done. Each solution developed must be nature-based / green, such as planting trees according to the funder for the project. This is a necessary approach to restore lost or damaged ecosystems and for involved project parties and community residents rely on / move forward  with using more nature-based /green solution when address environmental issues or impacts in the future.

Balthazar Community

The Balthazar Community is located on the eastern side of the island of Grenada, 3 miles west of the town of Grenville. The village of Balthazar, locally known as Camblair, was named from the Balthazar Estate, first owned by Edward Julias de Poullain in 1817.This village was and is noted as being best suited for agricultural production, because of an assured water-supply, being located on a riverbank and also because of its rich soil. The community thus has an agricultural background with many residents involved in farming, doing their own small production and also working with other farmers outside the village.

A number of persons are also engaged in construction work and travel out of the community on a daily basis to engage in that trade, returning in the late evening. The Balthazar community is considered to be one of the most affected areas in Grenada from the impacts of natural hazards, particularly flooding and soil erosion which happen mainly on riverbanks.

Such hazards are influenced by extreme rainfall events in combination with the actual overflowing of the river, known as the Great River. Up to this present day, older villagers can tell of horrific experiences thy have had, such as the sudden loss of homes during floods, resulting in forced relocation, and the loss of livelihood due to the destruction of economic resources such as agricultural crops and livestock on which people depend. Many villagers have reported that flooding is becoming more severe.

Farmers who have little or no measures to protect their crops from the incoming floods, suffer particularly. In addition, the flooding has been contributing to erosion of the riverbanks, impacting especially those residents living close to the water’s edge. A key community asset is immediately threatened — a playing field utilized by villagers of all ages but especially young males, floods very heavily when it rains. Measures previously put in place, such as an early warning system initially set up by the National Disaster Management Agency (NaDMA) in 2010 is no longer present as it was destroyed by the river during a heavy rainfall event.

 

Goal: Reduced impact of flooding in Balthazar Village through riverbank restoration and maintenance, and increased community knowledge on the use and benefits of nature based-solutions such as the planting of trees and other vegetation to mitigate future
impacts.

Balthazar Project activities

A few of the Balthazar team, ready to save their eroding river bank by planting trees, whose root are well adapted in holding soil particles together, slowing the rate of erosion by the overflowing river. 
Almonds were also planted because of their roots and economic potential for the community.                            

 

 

                                   

                             

        

Mango trees were also among the list of trees planted on the river bank because of its economic value.
On the ground work being done by the residents of Balthazar. Their first day of planting includes coconuts trees recommended by the agro-forestry expert, because of their ability to hold soil together with their fibrous roots

                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Telescope Community

Located approximately half a mile from Grenville within the parish of St. Andrews; Telescope is one of the largest communities in eastern Grenada. The norther barrier reef within the larger Grenville Bay area (of which Telescope is situated as part of the larger Grenville area) has deteriorated significantly over the years due to erosion and other natural as well as human influences. Telescope is considered high risk because it is a low-lying coastal community with significant income, housing and other asset-poverty, which means that scores of residents do not have sufficient material and other resources to respond to threats or events. Historically the community was colonized by the Spanish, French and British, leading to the retreat of the original indigenous community.

The community was converted into an estate. Estate conversion brought about practices such as mangrove cutting for burning of coals, and deforestation for establishment of housing settlements. These practices have continued to present day – with deforestation and unsustainable harvesting of mangroves in order to produce charcoal continuing by community residents; thereby decreasing the mangrove vegetation which should act as the first natural line of defense on the coastline. The community has historically depended heavily on the natural resources, leading to problems with effective conservation and management of natural resources. Over the years the sale of land opened up the area for settlement and several other developmental activities took place including building of a secondary school, a coffee plant (which was used as a means of employment for the villagers. The issue of sand mining became a critical matter as this led to beach/coastal erosion and degradation of marine resources.

 

Goal: To protect the coast from erosion caused by continuous wave action and other environmental hazards, by incorporating the use of community education and awareness with green solutions such as trees, and possible mangrove restoration.

 

Telescope Project activities

 

 

The Agro-forestry expert, Mr. Aiden Forteau demonstrating to the community on how to properly transplant the almond plants from their plastic containment to the ground.
The Telescope community enagsging in planting activity to help restore their eroding coastline, Almond seedlings are being prepared to be transplanted on the coast

 

 

More field work done by the community members of Telescope in unity, to save their land and home from destruction.
Coconuts were also planted on the Telescope coastline to prevent erosion, and to replace what was lost years ago by the violent wave action.                                                                                                                    

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                   

 

 

 

 

                                                   

Uncategorized
Project: CSOs for Disaster Resilience (IAF)

 

CSOs for Disaster Resilience

Empowering civil society organisation and local communities to build resilience to hurricanes and climate extremes in the Eastern Caribbean

 

The projects seeks to build resilience in local communities against hurricanes and climate extremes in the Eastern Caribbean by incorporating the use of community & ecosystem- based disaster risk reduction (CBDRR/Eco-DRR). The selected community will undergo a Vulnerability Capacity Assessment ( VCA), which involves speaking with residents to identify vulnerable/ at risk areas that are prone to the effects of hurricanes and other climate extremes. 

This project is funded by the Inter-American foundation (IAF), presented by the Caribbean Natural Resource Institute (CANARI) and implemented by Grenada Education and Development Programme  (GRENED). 

A total to 2 communities, Balthazar & Telescope were selected for this project to address the environmental issues faced for years based on the vulnerability capacity assessment done. Each solution developed must be nature-based / green, such as planting trees according to the funder for the project. This is a necessary approach to restore lost or damaged ecosystems and for involved project parties and community residents rely on / move forward  with using more nature-based /green solution when address environmental issues or impacts in the future.

Balthazar Community

The Balthazar Community is located on the eastern side of the island of Grenada, 3 miles west of the town of Grenville. The village of Balthazar, locally known as Camblair, was named from the Balthazar Estate, first owned by Edward Julias de Poullain in 1817.This village was and is noted as being best suited for agricultural production, because of an assured water-supply, being located on a riverbank and also because of its rich soil. The community thus has an agricultural background with many residents involved in farming, doing their own small production and also working with other farmers outside the village.

A number of persons are also engaged in construction work and travel out of the community on a daily basis to engage in that trade, returning in the late evening. The Balthazar community is considered to be one of the most affected areas in Grenada from the impacts of natural hazards, particularly flooding and soil erosion which happen mainly on riverbanks.

Such hazards are influenced by extreme rainfall events in combination with the actual overflowing of the river, known as the Great River. Up to this present day, older villagers can tell of horrific experiences thy have had, such as the sudden loss of homes during floods, resulting in forced relocation, and the loss of livelihood due to the destruction of economic resources such as agricultural crops and livestock on which people depend. Many villagers have reported that flooding is becoming more severe.

Farmers who have little or no measures to protect their crops from the incoming floods, suffer particularly. In addition, the flooding has been contributing to erosion of the riverbanks, impacting especially those residents living close to the water’s edge. A key community asset is immediately threatened — a playing field utilized by villagers of all ages but especially young males, floods very heavily when it rains. Measures previously put in place, such as an early warning system initially set up by the National Disaster Management Agency (NaDMA) in 2010 is no longer present as it was destroyed by the river during a heavy rainfall event.

 

Goal: Reduced impact of flooding in Balthazar Village through riverbank restoration and maintenance, and increased community knowledge on the use and benefits of nature based-solutions such as the planting of trees and other vegetation to mitigate future
impacts.

Balthazar Project activities

A few of the Balthazar team, ready to save their eroding river bank by planting trees, whose root are well adapted in holding soil particles together, slowing the rate of erosion by the overflowing river. 
Almonds were also planted because of their roots and economic potential for the community.                            

 

 

                                   

                             

        

Mango trees were also among the list of trees planted on the river bank because of its economic value.
On the ground work being done by the residents of Balthazar. Their first day of planting includes coconuts trees recommended by the agro-forestry expert, because of their ability to hold soil together with their fibrous roots

                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Telescope Community

Located approximately half a mile from Grenville within the parish of St. Andrews; Telescope is one of the largest communities in eastern Grenada. The norther barrier reef within the larger Grenville Bay area (of which Telescope is situated as part of the larger Grenville area) has deteriorated significantly over the years due to erosion and other natural as well as human influences. Telescope is considered high risk because it is a low-lying coastal community with significant income, housing and other asset-poverty, which means that scores of residents do not have sufficient material and other resources to respond to threats or events. Historically the community was colonized by the Spanish, French and British, leading to the retreat of the original indigenous community.

The community was converted into an estate. Estate conversion brought about practices such as mangrove cutting for burning of coals, and deforestation for establishment of housing settlements. These practices have continued to present day – with deforestation and unsustainable harvesting of mangroves in order to produce charcoal continuing by community residents; thereby decreasing the mangrove vegetation which should act as the first natural line of defense on the coastline. The community has historically depended heavily on the natural resources, leading to problems with effective conservation and management of natural resources. Over the years the sale of land opened up the area for settlement and several other developmental activities took place including building of a secondary school, a coffee plant (which was used as a means of employment for the villagers. The issue of sand mining became a critical matter as this led to beach/coastal erosion and degradation of marine resources.

 

Goal: To protect the coast from erosion caused by continuous wave action and other environmental hazards, by incorporating the use of community education and awareness with green solutions such as trees, and possible mangrove restoration.

 

Telescope Project activities

 

 

The Agro-forestry expert, Mr. Aiden Forteau demonstrating to the community on how to properly transplant the almond plants from their plastic containment to the ground.
The Telescope community enagsging in planting activity to help restore their eroding coastline, Almond seedlings are being prepared to be transplanted on the coast

 

 

More field work done by the community members of Telescope in unity, to save their land and home from destruction.
Coconuts were also planted on the Telescope coastline to prevent erosion, and to replace what was lost years ago by the violent wave action.                                                                                                                    

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                   

 

 

 

 

                                                   

GRENED’s General Blog

What is in your Life’s Blue Print? 

                        

 

GRENED CELEBRATES ITS 25TH ANNIVERSARY

 

Dear friends, colleagues and our beloved communities, 

Greetings!
GRENED marks 25 years of its existence today Friday, 16th July 2021.
Massive and sincere thanks to each of you for your love, support and best wishes over these two and a half decades!   We could not have graduated over 300 students without you!  We could not have continued personal development, poetry and prose writing groups,  climate change education, swimming classes and much more without you.  Thank you, thank you, thank you!
Please continue to pray for GRENED’s continued well-being, send us top students to support to be professionals and leaders in Grenada,  donate to our organisation and  watch for our end of year celebration.  
Much obliged!
For the GRENED  team,
Cosmos Joseph                                      Dessima M. Williams
Chair of the Board                                   Executive Director
Uncategorized
GRENED’s General Blog

What is in your Life’s Blue Print? 

                        

 

GRENED CELEBRATES ITS 25TH ANNIVERSARY

 

Dear friends, colleagues and our beloved communities, 

Greetings!
GRENED marks 25 years of its existence today Friday, 16th July 2021.
Massive and sincere thanks to each of you for your love, support and best wishes over these two and a half decades!   We could not have graduated over 300 students without you!  We could not have continued personal development, poetry and prose writing groups,  climate change education, swimming classes and much more without you.  Thank you, thank you, thank you!
Please continue to pray for GRENED’s continued well-being, send us top students to support to be professionals and leaders in Grenada,  donate to our organisation and  watch for our end of year celebration.  
Much obliged!
For the GRENED  team,
Cosmos Joseph                                      Dessima M. Williams
Chair of the Board                                   Executive Director